In this article

In this article, Kayser, Mauron, and Miah (2009) claim that anti-doping policies provide disadvantages for athletes. First of all, using performance-enhancing drugs is the same as having the preeminent gene, so it is not reasonable to forbid one factor that could affect the fairness of competitions. Also, doing sports itself is dangerous and anti-doping control disrupts the study of how to reduce the risk with performance-enhancing drugs. It might be beneficial for athletes if some performance-enhancing drugs are legalized. The management of athletes to take drugs becomes more convenient and inexpensive. With a deeper understanding of legalized doping, using drugs could be safer, more rational, and it would cause fewer health problems. As Kayser, Mauron, and Miah argue in this article, doctors who provide athletes with medical supports should not be punished since their goal is to help athletes achieve greater success. As the harm caused by doping is inexplicit and the moral concerns of this problem still support the prohibition of doping, there is no winner of this battle within a short time.